Review: Muwatta’ al-Imam Malik: Riwayat al-Shafi’i ‘an Malik

Book Review: ‘Muwatta’  al-Imam Malik: Riwayat al-Shafi’i ‘an Malik’, al-Banjari, Muhammad Lutfi, Karachi: Majlis al-Da’wah wa al-Tahqiq al-Islami, 357 pages

By Maulana Zeeshan Chaudri

The Muwatta’ of Imam Malik (d.179) requires no introduction as 100s of books have been written over the centuries studying various aspects of the goldmine. This collection of Malik demonstrates the juristic acumen and expertise of the mujtahid of Medina. Interest in the book has transcended madhhab affiliations with even one of the famous transmission of the book coming via the student of Imam Abu Hanifah (d.150), Imam Muhammad ibn al-Hasan al-Shaybani (d.182). Malik’s Muwatta’ had many transmitters[1] and it became a debate amongst later Hadith experts as whose transmission from Malik was the most superior?Read More »

Book Review: “The Divine Reality: God, Islam, & the Mirage of Atheism” by Hamza Tzortzis

the-divine-reality

Review by Hamdija Begovic

 

The Divine Reality: God, Islam & The Mirage Of Atheism

Author: Hamza Andreas Tzortzis

Publishing: December 2016. San Clemente, California: FB Publishing

ISBN-10: 0996545387

Format: Paperback, 322 pages

Generally, there are two ways to critically analyse a belief system: one is to tackle standard arguments countering them by engaging in refutations and counter-refutations – what I shall term the polemical method. The other approach is to focus on ‘unmasking’[1] a belief system which entails deconstructing and analysing the foundations upon which it is built. This method I will term the sociological one. Given my own background as a sociologist, my preference is predictably with the latter – Read More »

Book Review: Hanafi Principles of Testing Hadith

Review by: Waqar Akbar Cheema

Title: Hanafi Principles of Testing Hadith 
Author: Atabek Shukurov An-Nasafi / Sulaiman Ahmed (translator)  
Publisher: Avicenna Academy, UK  
Release Date: May 1, 2015  
Format: Hardback  
Pages: ix + 311  

The book is allegedly an attempt at revival of hanafi methdology in hadith. However, in reality far from representing the hanafi school’s actual approach it is an attempt at putting a ‘scholarly’ garb on compromising hadith as a source of Islamic law and etiquette in view of the pressing polemics and criticism coming from a different world-view.

Read More »

New Release: What the Living Can Do for the Dead by White Thread Press

al-Salam ‘alaykum,What-the-Living

White Thread Press recently released a new publication which covers concepts of eschatology, procedures for funeral, burial, last rites, and practices related to the deceased (such as īsāl al-thawāb, atonements, debts) and graveyards:

What the Living Can Do for the Dead
According to the Qur’an and Sunna and the Opinions of the Classical Scholars of Islam
By Dr. Shahrul Hussain

Pages: 175
Format: Softcover
Dimensions: 5.5″ x 8.5″
Pub. Date: June 2016
ISBN: 978-1-93-376414-6
Read More »

The Life of Muhammad: A Critique of Guillaume’s English Translation

By Dr. ‘Abdul Latif Tibawi

Professor Guillaume is not merely offering a translation of the received text of the biography of Muhammad, as recorded by Ibn Hisham from al-Bakka’i, from Ibn Ishaq. His work is a translation of his own reconstruction of Ibn Ishaq ….

… one gathers from the concluding words on page v that the translator hopes that his translation will ‘help to further cooperation and friendliness between my country and the Islamic world.’ This is an aim which is, of course, more expedient than academic, but it is nevertheless a commendable one, formulated as it is by a student of Islam who is at the same time an Anglican clergyman. It is difficult, however, to see how a profane transformation of the received text of the life of Muhammad such as is attempted by Professor Guillaume is likely to commend itself to the Islamic world.Read More »

Book Review: Janāb Gurū Nānak Jī awr Islām

Fārūq, Muammad, Janāb Gurū Nānak Jī ؒ awr Islām, Maktaba Mamūdiyya, UP (1431/2010), 80 pages, paperback.

Review by Shahin-ur Rahman

Concise and easy to read, this succinct treatise on comparative religion offers a profound insight into the life of Gurū Nānak, who is believed to be the founder of the Sikh religion. Targeting the objective Sikh observer, the author presents a well-referenced Urdu biography of Gurū Nānak, proving him to be not only a Muslim, but a knowledgeable Muslim leader.

It should be known that the objective of the book was not to celebrate Gurū Nānak and boast that he adhered to the same religion as the author does.[1] Rather, quite the opposite is true: the author’s intent behind this work was to bring forth anecdotes of Gurū Nānak’s biography, which can assist the objective researcher in identifying the true teachings of Gurū Nānak as he himself taught. This would, in turn, be a means of guiding the Sikh brethren to reconsider their perception of Sikhism, and, thereby, adopt the religion that Gurū Nānak had truly preached. This is evident from the ‘food for thought’ at the end of the booklet, where the author requests the Sikh brethren to read this book side by side with the original sources and compare the two to reach an unbiased conclusion.[2]Read More »